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Ken Hugessen

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Chaya Cooperberg

Investor Relations
John Caldwell

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The Boardroom Beverly Behan


Top Stories

Capital alternatives for mining

The industry slump that was remains the slump that is. Traditional funders are sidelined and the public markets stone cold. Yet if mining companies are willing to expand their options, there’s still some alternative financing out there
By Robert Olsen
February 28th, 2015

Over the past couple of years, many have talked about the green shoots of recovery and hopes of better times around the corner for the mining industry. Unfortunately, the deep freeze continues, and that means continuing discontent for those looking … Continue reading

Mining’s last, best good news story

Profits in the mining sector? Earnings growth? They exist. Yes, Silver Wheaton has some important tests ahead—but every day is still a good day for the king of the stream
By Robert Thompson
February 27th, 2015

“Please stay tuned, we should have a very good fourth quarter.” Randy Smallwood signs off Silver Wheaton Corp.’s (TSX:SLW) most recent quarterly conference call with investment analysts from the major banks and brokerages, in mid-November, sounding eager and bullish. As … Continue reading

Ripples on the land

In a first-ever judgment last June, the Supreme Court of Canada awarded the Tsilhqot’in First Nation aboriginal title to 1,700 square kilometres of territory in the B.C. interior. What does it mean for mining and resource development in Canada?
By Kerry Banks
February 27th, 2015

The long-awaited decision came down on June 26, 2014. By a unanimous 8-0 decision, the Supreme Court of Canada granted declaration of aboriginal title to more than 1,700 square kilometres of land in British Columbia’s interior to the Tsilhqot’in (chil-ko-teen) … Continue reading

Deets from above

Exploration companies have been dropping claiming stakes from helicopters for 30 years. But it’s never been ruled ok in Ontario, until now
By Brian Banks
February 27th, 2015

Hearing lawyer Richard Butler describe it, one imagines only two things were missing in the airborne claim-staking blitz that KWG Resources Inc. (TSX-V:KWG) unleashed on unsuspecting rival Noront Resources Ltd. (TSX-V:NOT) on a potentially important Ring of Fire property the … Continue reading

Mining slump now an endurance test

The rough ride continues for commodities and the companies that mine them. Strong firms are still coping, but the casualty rate is on the rise
By Jim Middlemiss
February 27th, 2015

From energy to interest rates, there haven’t been a lot of bright spots in the economy in 2015. But leave it to metals and mining, a sector now almost four years removed from the dizzying heights of its last cyclical … Continue reading

The big reveal

Ottawa’s new Transparency Measures Act doesn’t just open the window on payments by miners and other resources companies to domestic and foreign governments, it puts them under lights
By Brenda Bouw
February 27th, 2015

Mining companies and other resource developers in Canada have an added priority for 2015: preparing for a new federal law expected to take effect later this year that requires them to open their books on payments made to governments around … Continue reading

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Ticker

Mining slump now an endurance test

The rough ride continues for commodities and the companies that mine them. Strong firms are still coping, but the casualty rate is on the rise
By Jim Middlemiss
February 27th, 2015

From energy to interest rates, there haven’t been a lot of bright spots in the economy in 2015. But leave it to metals and mining, a sector now almost four years removed from the dizzying heights of its last cyclical … Continue reading

Oil prices: each day brings more drama

Contained caution in Canadian energy and economic circles has given way to increasing alarm as oil prices—off about 40% from June through November—head towards New Year's in a nose dive
By Paul Brent
December 19th, 2014

The last few months have been a tough time for peak oil doomsayers, OPEC oil sheiks, petroleum executives as well as finance ministers from Edmonton to Ottawa and as far east as St. John’s. Their common and constant migraine, of … Continue reading

M&A rules get an overhaul

The Canadian Securities Administrators, with unanimous provincial support, is proposing new rules on takeover bids. Target boards and shareholders will get more leverage, bidders will need to rethink strategy
By John Greenwood
October 30th, 2014

Big changes often start imperceptibly until suddenly they become fact, part of the landscape. That’s a good description for the Canadian Securities Administrators’ recently proposed changes to regulations on takeover bids and shareholder rights plans which, assuming they’re adopted, will … Continue reading

Federal securities regulator in view

Draft legislation paves way for 2015 implementation, while Ottawa works to get more provinces onside
October 30th, 2014

By next fall, if the federal government continues on its present course, the proposed Cooperative Capital Markets regulatory system will be up and running—taking the country partway to meeting the Conservative government’s eight-year-old effort to create a single national securities … Continue reading

A wedge of allegiance

Pierre Karl Péladeau’s decision to retain active control of his Quebecor shares while sitting as a PQ member in the provincial legislature raises interesting questions about governance and conflict
By Mark Anderson
August 23rd, 2014

For the board of Montreal-based telecommunications and media giant Quebecor Inc. (TSX:QBR.B), the months since March must have seemed vaguely surreal. First, majority owner Pierre Karl Péladeau resigned his chairmanship of the company his father founded in order to run … Continue reading

Proxy voting: no quick fix

The CSA gets full marks for making its review of the shareholder proxy voting system a priority. But can it get the participants on the same page?
By Jim Middlemiss
April 21st, 2014

The Canadian Securities Administrators’ consultation paper on the messy proxy voting arena (Consultation Paper 54-401: Review of the Proxy Voting Infrastructure), which last summer kicked off an extended review of the proxy system, is revealing a deep divide among the … Continue reading

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Views

Capital alternatives for mining

The industry slump that was remains the slump that is. Traditional funders are sidelined and the public markets stone cold. Yet if mining companies are willing to expand their options, there’s still some alternative financing out there
By Robert Olsen
February 28th, 2015

Over the past couple of years, many have talked about the green shoots of recovery and hopes of better times around the corner for the mining industry. Unfortunately, the deep freeze continues, and that means continuing discontent for those looking … Continue reading

Make long-term value your guide

When executive operational performance and market returns are out of sync, what’s a compensation committee to do? Check and recheck the pay-for-performance rationale and share it with shareholders
By Ken Hugessen
February 27th, 2015

As with all commodity players, mining companies are largely price takers, subject to price swings reflecting global macroeconomics, geopolitical forces and changes in underlying supply and demand over which management have no control. Moreover, absolute share-price performance among the miners … Continue reading

Exactly what gets results?

Corporate social responsibility has become a key part of the way larger companies—and miners of all sizes—do business. But measuring CSR’s impact is just starting to catch up
By Sandra Odendahl
February 27th, 2015

Surf any corporate website and you will see plenty of information about employees volunteering on company time, dollars given to charity and business activities to reduce energy or paper use. What you don’t see as often is an indication of … Continue reading

Electricity restructuring spells opportunity

Shifting demands, new technologies, cost constraints and a fragmented distribution system have Ontario’s electricity sector in line for a major restructuring, which promises to be a transformational opportunity for investors
By Robert Olsen
December 18th, 2014

As jurisdictions restructure their energy and power sectors due to a rapidly changing market, they offer windows of transformational opportunity for major investors. Such an opening is now poised to emerge in Ontario’s electricity sector, which faces a significant restructuring … Continue reading

Balancing disclosure and defence

Not all activists are bad and not all companies are good—but an early warning system without a 5% disclosure threshold leaves issuers unfairly disadvantaged and underprotected
By Chaya Cooperberg
December 18th, 2014

At a recent Ontario Securities Commission event in Toronto, celebrity hedge-fund manager Bill Ackman of Pershing Square Capital noted that Canada is a more accommodating environment for shareholder activists than the U.S. “It’s a better regime in almost every measure,” … Continue reading

Out with the old

Canada’s corporate governance guidelines, enacted in 2005, are woefully out of date. The world, and the world of governance, have changed dramatically since then. Worse, our deficiencies hurt and are holding us back
By Richard Leblanc
December 18th, 2014

In my teaching, research and consulting, I no longer use National Policy 58-201 Corporate Governance Guidelines (enacted June 17, 2005), which applies to publicly traded companies in Canada, as an example of exemplary corporate governance. I regard it as stale … Continue reading

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Features

Mining’s last, best good news story

Profits in the mining sector? Earnings growth? They exist. Yes, Silver Wheaton has some important tests ahead—but every day is still a good day for the king of the stream
By Robert Thompson
February 27th, 2015

“Please stay tuned, we should have a very good fourth quarter.” Randy Smallwood signs off Silver Wheaton Corp.’s (TSX:SLW) most recent quarterly conference call with investment analysts from the major banks and brokerages, in mid-November, sounding eager and bullish. As … Continue reading

Ripples on the land

In a first-ever judgment last June, the Supreme Court of Canada awarded the Tsilhqot’in First Nation aboriginal title to 1,700 square kilometres of territory in the B.C. interior. What does it mean for mining and resource development in Canada?
By Kerry Banks
February 27th, 2015

The long-awaited decision came down on June 26, 2014. By a unanimous 8-0 decision, the Supreme Court of Canada granted declaration of aboriginal title to more than 1,700 square kilometres of land in British Columbia’s interior to the Tsilhqot’in (chil-ko-teen) … Continue reading

Deets from above

Exploration companies have been dropping claiming stakes from helicopters for 30 years. But it’s never been ruled ok in Ontario, until now
By Brian Banks
February 27th, 2015

Hearing lawyer Richard Butler describe it, one imagines only two things were missing in the airborne claim-staking blitz that KWG Resources Inc. (TSX-V:KWG) unleashed on unsuspecting rival Noront Resources Ltd. (TSX-V:NOT) on a potentially important Ring of Fire property the … Continue reading

Once repatriated, twice shy

SPECIAL REPORT ON M&A: DEAL OF THE YEAR | Tim Hortons, a national icon, wasn’t for sale. If Burger King was intent on buying the coffee shop giant, Tim Hortons’ management and board said premium price was just a starting point. Then they insisted on—and got—conditions to help the deal go down on Main Street
By Robert Thompson
December 17th, 2014

They weren’t looking for it, were not expecting it, and it initially elicited as much interest as a day-old cruller. But Tim Hortons Inc.’s takeover by fast-food giant Burger King Worldwide Inc. is Listed’s 2014 “Deal of the Year,” for … Continue reading

Big, bold and bountiful

SPECIAL REPORT ON M&A: 2014 REVIEW | In one of the best years on record for mergers and acquisitions in Canada, activity crossed all sectors and strategic buyers were out in force capitalizing on perfect conditions for buying and selling assets
By Jim Middlemiss
December 17th, 2014

Canada’s mergers and acquisition markets were on fire in 2014, hitting some of the highest levels since the financial crisis. What fueled such activity? Low interest rates, a stock market that didn’t get choppy until the fourth quarter, and a … Continue reading

Money talks, excessive pay walks

SPECIAL REPORT: PREPARING FOR PROXY SEASON | An effective proxy season strategy takes in many elements. But these days, nothing within the board’s oversight is more critical to the process, and to AGM voting itself, than executive compensation
By John Greenwood
December 17th, 2014

One of the distinguishing traits of a good board of directors is they try to be prepared, so they’re always looking ahead, craning their necks to figure out what’s coming around the next bend. Back in 2010 the board at … Continue reading

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The Director's Chair

Eira Thomas: Engage early and often

In The Director’s Chair with David W. Anderson: Eira Thomas, storied geologist turned founder, director, CEO and chair, says sharp stakeholder relations and smart governance are making winners in mining today
February 26th, 2014

Eira Thomas burst onto the Canadian mining scene in the 1990s, leading the Aber Resources Ltd. field exploration team that discovered the Diavik diamond project pipes in the Northwest Territories. By the time Diavik went into production in 2003, as … Continue reading

John Manley: The new multi-stakeholder reality

In The Director’s Chair with David W. Anderson: As a former inner-circle federal cabinet minister, John Manley knows how government makes decisions. Similar thinking, he says, is needed in the corporate world
December 16th, 2013

John Manley, deputy prime minister under Jean Chrétien, says he’s learned a lot in the 10 years he’s been working on corporate boards since leaving politics— particularly in his time as a director at Canadian Pacific Railway prior to the … Continue reading

Gary Colter: Setting the bar high—where it belongs

In The Director’s Chair with David W. Anderson: No matter what the business, director Gary Colter says there’s no excuse for boards to cling to dated, inefficient and ineffective modes of governance
September 16th, 2013

As a member of the dissident slate of directors that shareholders voted into power in the gripping Canadian Pacific Railway proxy battle of 2012, Gary Colter has had a front row seat for recent debates over directors’ duties and effective … Continue reading

Robert Monks: It’s broke, let’s fix it

In The Director’s Chair with David W. Anderson: Shareholder activist and avowed capitalist Robert Monks doesn’t have it in for senior corporate managers—just the system that gives them all the power and too much pay
June 20th, 2013

If you read Robert Monks’ bio—founder of Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS), author of eight books, and a chair and director many times over—your first inclination is to say that’s résumé enough for two. Yet the substance of his work—shareholder and … Continue reading

Dominic Barton: On fast bucks and real value

In The Director’s Chair with David W. Anderson: Dominic Barton, global managing director of McKinsey & Co., sounds the alarm for Western business leaders, markets and investors: lose the short-term bias or lose the race
April 15th, 2013

Dominic Barton grew up on Canada’s west coast and, a couple of decades later, made his way to the top job at global consulting giant McKinsey & Co. via postings in Seoul and then Shanghai. So it’s no surprise to … Continue reading

Hugh Bolton: The bottom line on oversight

In The Director’s Chair with David W. Anderson: Hugh Bolton, former top accountant, now top chair and director, says directors on resource sector boards must dig for answers to really know the business they’re in
February 25th, 2013

Hugh Bolton had a sterling career as a chartered accountant, culminating in his role as head of Coopers & Lybrand Canada in the 1990s. The insights gained in that arena have also served him exceedingly well in his second career … Continue reading

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Handbook

The big reveal

Ottawa’s new Transparency Measures Act doesn’t just open the window on payments by miners and other resources companies to domestic and foreign governments, it puts them under lights
By Brenda Bouw
February 27th, 2015

Mining companies and other resource developers in Canada have an added priority for 2015: preparing for a new federal law expected to take effect later this year that requires them to open their books on payments made to governments around … Continue reading

Is your barrel half empty or half full?

Everybody’s talking about the impact of plunging oil prices on petro regions and energy producers—but what about the mining sector? Our correspondent sees a range of consequences, many of them good
By Ian McGugan
February 27th, 2015

The unexpected and still largely unexplained plunge in the price of oil is enough to throw a scare into any commodity producer. When the world’s most vital and heavily traded raw material can lose half its value in six months—for … Continue reading

The term-limit era has begun

The new “comply or explain” regime for gender diversity on boards and in senior management that comes into effect for 2015 also requires issuers to embrace board renewal. For some, it will be a challenge—and that’s the point
By Ken Mark
December 18th, 2014

Boards and senior staff at many Canadian publicly listed companies face new paperwork and then some before their 2015 annual general meetings. That’s because as of December 31, 2014, securities regulators in nine of Canada’s 13 provinces and territories will … Continue reading

Helping Europe at our expense?

The timing of Canada’s free trade deal with Europe—as euro zone economies continue to struggle—couldn’t be worse. Some Canadian companies may benefit, but the deal’s likely winners will be low-priced European competitors expanding here
By Ian McGugan
December 18th, 2014

Europe’s economic crisis is over—isn’t it? The headlines have calmed down, bond markets are tranquil, a Greek default no longer hangs over the global economy. It’s enough to make a casual observer conclude that the worst is past. Look closer, … Continue reading

Board offsite as shareholder activism boot camp

Instead of waiting for a shareholder activist attack, boards should use strategic retreats to look at themselves through an activist lens—and then take steps to be ready if the real thing occurs
By Beverly Behan
December 18th, 2014

Boards that find themselves in the crosshairs of a shareholder activist spend inordinate amounts of time and money developing a defensive strategy and putting it into play. Yet, by the time a shareholder activist comes knocking, it may already be … Continue reading

Test of character

It seems obvious that good directors and top executives be individuals of good character. But is it possible to measure and screen for it when recruiting?
By Ken Mark
October 30th, 2014

It’s been six years since the rock-bottom depths of the financial crisis, yet that period remains a constant point of reference when business people, economists, academics and even social commentators assess root causes of failure at companies and in the … Continue reading

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Economy

Is your barrel half empty or half full?

Everybody’s talking about the impact of plunging oil prices on petro regions and energy producers—but what about the mining sector? Our correspondent sees a range of consequences, many of them good
By Ian McGugan
February 27th, 2015

The unexpected and still largely unexplained plunge in the price of oil is enough to throw a scare into any commodity producer. When the world’s most vital and heavily traded raw material can lose half its value in six months—for … Continue reading

Helping Europe at our expense?

The timing of Canada’s free trade deal with Europe—as euro zone economies continue to struggle—couldn’t be worse. Some Canadian companies may benefit, but the deal’s likely winners will be low-priced European competitors expanding here
By Ian McGugan
December 18th, 2014

Europe’s economic crisis is over—isn’t it? The headlines have calmed down, bond markets are tranquil, a Greek default no longer hangs over the global economy. It’s enough to make a casual observer conclude that the worst is past. Look closer, … Continue reading

Canada: the third amigo

Mexico’s surging manufacturing sector and growing economy mean its influence in NAFTA will soon supersede our own. But that doesn’t have to be a bad thing
By Ian McGugan
October 30th, 2014

Welcome, economics fans, to the 2014 version of Name that Country. Today’s clue: This nation, which shares a border with the United States, has large oil and gas reserves, is headed by a pro-business leader intent on shaking up the … Continue reading

Divided we stand

Western Canada’s place as the country’s economic engine isn’t changing anytime soon. That puts the onus on policy makers to take a new look at their priorities—for all Canadians’ sake
By Ian McGugan
August 24th, 2014

Nearly 70 years ago, a novel by Hugh MacLennan captured the struggle that then weighed on many Canadian minds. Two Solitudes told the story of a young writer torn between French and English cultures. If that quintessentially Canadian novel were … Continue reading

How strong is this castle?

King Cotton once ruled the economy of the southern U.S. Then it didn’t. The reign of oil may be no more secure
By Ian McGugan
June 5th, 2014

In the run-up to the U.S. Civil War, southern secessionists argued the slave-owning states had nothing to fear by going it alone. The Deep South produced so much of the world’s cotton—a vital commodity in the mid-19th century—that “King Cotton” … Continue reading

Bitcoin, or something like it

Despite bitcoin’s recent floundering, it’s hard to envision a future that doesn’t include a digital currency. But that won’t happen until those currencies’ backers address the hurdles that matter
By Ian McGugan
April 21st, 2014

Bitcoin’s biggest fans were too smug, too self-righteous, for their own good. For five years, they lectured the rest of us about the superiority of digital currencies and bitcoin’s blessed freedom from the stifling hand of government regulation. So they … Continue reading

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Insider

Nickeled and primed

Insider: David Pathe
February 26th, 2015

Who David Pathe, president and CEO, Sherritt International Corp. (TSX:S), a major Canadian producer of nickel and oil with operations in Western Canada, Madagascar and, most notably, Cuba, where it has mining, energy and power interests. Involvement Pathe has been … Continue reading

A force in finance

Insider: Steve Hudson
December 16th, 2014

Who Steve Hudson, CEO and chairman of Element Financial Corp. (TSX:EFN) of Toronto, which he took public in 2011 to finance the acquisition of receivables in key verticals including commercial and vendor financing, rail, aviation and fleet management. Element has … Continue reading

A deeper bench

Insider: Mark Healy
October 30th, 2014

Who Mark Healy, president and CEO, CST Trust Co. (CST) and American Stock Transfer & Trust Co. (AST), part of the Australian-based Link Group. Involvement This spring, AST bought D.F. King & Co. Inc., of New York, one of the … Continue reading

A CEO entrance interview

Insider: Ravi Saligram
August 27th, 2014

  Who Ravi Saligram, chief executive officer and director of Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Inc. (TSX:RBA), the world’s largest industrial auctioneer, based in Burnaby, B.C., with operations in 25 countries and 44 auction sites worldwide, and 2013 revenue of $467 million. … Continue reading

Reporting gets strategic

Insider: Paul Druckman
April 21st, 2014

Who Paul Druckman, chief executive officer of the International Integrated Reporting Council (IIRC). The IIRC hit a major milestone in December with its release of the international integrated reporting framework, a roadmap for companies that want to begin integrated reporting. … Continue reading

Tough times? It’s IR as usual

Insider: David Garofalo
February 26th, 2014

Who David Garofalo, president and CEO HudBay Minerals Inc. (TSX:HBM), one of Canada’s few mid-tier mining companies, producing gold, copper, zinc and silver, with projects in development in North and South America. Involvement Garofalo, who was appointed CEO at HudBay … Continue reading

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